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Hong Kong Tourist Attractions

Hong Kong’s top 10 attractions are popular for good reason. Those who came here before you voted with their feet and this was their verdict.

  • The Peak

    The Peak

    The highest point on Hong Kong Island, this has been the city’s most exclusive neighbourhood since colonial times — back then it was the cooler air that attracted the rich and famous; in the post air-conditioning era, the views of one of the world’s most spectacular cityscapes keep them coming.That view is also what makes The Peak one of the most popular attractions in Hong Kong. By day your eyes stretch across sparkling skyscrapers and Victoria Harbour all the way to the green hills of the New Territories. In early evening this panorama melts into pink and orange before reincarnating as a dazzling galaxy of light, shimmering beneath you. And if you listen carefully enough, you can hear Asia’s world city humming below.

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  • Hong Kong Disneyland

    Hong Kong Disneyland

    Hong Kong Disneyland is presenting a series of spectacular events! From “Star Wars™: Tomorrowland Takeover” to its 10th anniversary celebrations, these sensational events cannot be missed.

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  • Hong Kong Ocean Park

    Ocean Park Hong Kong

    Opened in 1977, Ocean Park Hong Kong is a marine-life theme park featuring animal exhibits, thrill rides and shows. In 2012, its impressive ability to offer guests a world-class experience that blends entertainment with education and conservation was confirmed when it became the first Asian winner of the biannual Applause Award, the most prestigious award in the amusement and theme park industry. The park is located on the southern side of Hong Kong Island, covering more than 915,000 square metres. The Waterfront and The Summit areas are connected by the Cable Car and Ocean Express funicular train.

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  • Ladies' Market

    Ladies' Market

    With over 100 stalls of bargain clothing, accessories and souvenirs, the Ladies’ Market on Tung Choi Street provides a one-kilometre stretch on which to practise your haggling skills. It gets its name from the huge amount of clothing and accessories on sale for women of all ages; however, with watches, cosmetics, bags, home furnishings, CDs and trinkets also up for grabs, you don’t need to be just in the market for a pair of nylon stockings to find something within its crowded aisles.

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  • Temple Street Night Market

    Temple Street Night Market

    When the sun goes down, the traders have already laid out their wares and the opera singers and fortune tellers begin to emerge. Welcome to the Temple Street Night Market, a popular street bazaar, named after a Tin Hau temple located in the centre of its main drag, and a place so steeped in local atmosphere that it has served as the backdrop to many a memorable movie. Trinkets, tea ware, electronics, watches, menswear, jade and antiques are scrutinised and haggled over, while claypot rice, seafood, noodles and other treats are consumed with gusto. Temple Street Night Market is an enduring example of the theatre and festivity of a Chinese market. And it’s on show nightly.

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  • Golden Bauhinia Square (and HKCEC)

    Golden Bauhinia Square (and HKCEC)

    The bauhinia is the emblem of Hong Kong. The Forever Blooming Bauhinia Sculpture that gives the Expo Promenade the commonly used name, Golden Bauhinia Square, was a gift from the Central Government to mark the 1997 Handover — an occasion that held tremendous significance for the world’s largest nation and that stands out as a landmark event in 20th century history. Today the site is hugely popular with Chinese visitors who come to take photos of the Reunification Monument, which bears inscriptions of the calligraphy of President Jiang Zemin who represented China at the Handover Ceremony and to enjoy the pomp and symbolism of the daily Flag-raising Ceremony with beautiful Victoria Harbour as a backdrop.

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  • Clock Tower

    Clock Tower

    Standing 44-metres tall, the old Clock Tower was erected in 1915 as part of the Kowloon–Canton Railway terminus. The once-bustling station is long gone, but this red brick and granite tower, now preserved as a Declared Monument, survives as an elegant reminder of the Age of Steam. It has also been a memorable landmark for the millions of Chinese immigrants who passed through the terminus to begin new lives not just in Hong Kong, but in other parts of the world via the city’s harbour.

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  • Tsim Sha Tsui Promenade

    Tsim Sha Tsui Promenade

    Starting at the colonial-era Clock Tower and stretching all the way to Hung Hom, a stroll along the Tsim Sha Tsui Promenade takes one past the Hong Kong Cultural Centre and the Hong Kong Space Museum. But like most of the love birds and shutterbugs on the promenade, your gaze will be drawn south to the dramatic topographical and architectural spectacle that is the Hong Kong Island skyline towering over the busy waters of Victoria Harbour.

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  • Lan Kwai Fong

    Lan Kwai Fong

    Lan Kwai Fong is one of Hong Kong’s most popular nightlife hot spots and home to over 90 restaurants and bars. The atmosphere ranges from stylish wine pairings to raucous jelly shots and the food on offer is as diverse as the clientele. Thanks to Hong Kong’s dominance in Asian cinema, this centre of late-night revelry is so renowned that its official street sign is more photographed than many of the celebrities who haunt its clubs. Mostly, the area is crowded with people from the surrounding offices of Central, eager to shake off the working day or week. Get in the thick of it with a street side perch, or watch the antics on the road below from one of the upper floors. Lan Kwai Fong usually hosts carnivals and other celebrations during major festivals, such as Halloween, Christmas and New Year and has its own beer festival.

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  • Wong Tai Sin Temple

    Wong Tai Sin Temple

    The Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple’s claim to ‘make every wish come true upon request’ might have something to do with its popularity. Home to three religions (Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism), its natural setting and beautifully ornamented buildings make it as much a scenic attraction as an important religious centre. The temple commemorates the famous monk of yore, Wong Tai Sin (also known as Huang Chu-ping), who was born in the Fourth century and became a deity at Heng Shan (Red Pine Hill). In 1915, Taoist priest Liang Ren-an carried a sacred portrait of Wong Tai Sin from Guangdong in southern China to Hong Kong. Now housing this precious portrait, the Wong Tai Sin Temple is where worshippers pray for good fortune through offerings, divine guidance and fortune telling.

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